Risk, Health and Safety Glossary

Risk, Health and Safety Glossary

Policy Code: CG1877

Definitions

TERM DEFINITION
Area responsibility In the context of emergency planning, the responsibility for the provision and maintenance of suitable warden, deputy warden, first aid services and Local Emergency Instructions in each Area of each campus has been assigned to a nominated Portfolio.  Nominated Portfolios are said to have "Area Responsibility" for these buildings, floors, etc.  Refer to the Area Responsibilities column of the Emergency Control Record.  In cases where a School/Directorate/Centre within a Portfolio organises activities in locations not included in the list of Areas (e.g. off-campus excursions), that School/Directorate/Centre (and by extension the relevant Portfolio) is deemed to have "Area Responsibility" for that activity.
As far as reasonably practicable When managing an injury or illness, means practicable having regard to:
• the severity of the injury or illness and the number of casualties;
• the availability of University First Aiders;
• the availability of other trained first aiders, medical or para-medical personnel;
• the availability of a next-of-kin, legal guardian, etc, of the casualty or casualties; and
• the wishes of any casualty or casualties.
Authorised Work at Height Supervisor A person who has been assessed by a Manager of Facilities Services of the University to have the competencies and authority to issue Work at Height Permits under the Work at Height Procedure.
Bomb   Any explosive device, or any object intended to be mistaken for an explosive device, fabricated, placed or used in an unlawful manner.  Bombs incorporate materials designed to destroy, injure, frighten or harass the intended target(s).  The materials may be explosive, incendiary, pyrotechnic, noxious, injurious, destructive, corrosive, etc.  
Bomb threat Any indication that a bomb is placing members of the University community at risk.  Bomb threats can arise from:
• verbal threats made over the phone or by recorded message sent to a member of the University community, media organisations, Police, etc;
• written threats (mailed letters, e-mails, faxes, hand-delivered or couriered messages, etc); or
• the discovery of a suspect object, or suspect item of mail.
Casualty see Injury or Illness
Critical incident An event or series of events that create an immediate or imminent threat of serious harm and/or trauma to members of the University community.
Examples include:
• fatal or life-threatening accident somehow connected to the University;
• murder, suicide, serious injury, serious physical or sexual assault on campus or in the context of University-endorsed activities;
• fire, explosion, structural collapse, bomb threat, serious chemical spill, natural disaster or environmental accident somehow connected to the University;
• serious health issue among members of the University community (e.g. outbreak of infectious disease among students). 
Critical Incident Plan (CIP) The document outlining the roles and responsibilities of the members of the CIT.  The CIP is made available to members of the CIT in a document-controlled form, but is not generally available to others.  
Critical Incident Team (CIT) The group of University executive officers responsible for the strategic management of critical incidents.  The CIT is primarily composed of the members of the Vice-Chancellor’s Senior Team as well as selected Deans/Directors, Supervisors/Managers (co-opted members).  
Danger Tag This tag indicates that the person whose name appears on the tag is working on the item of plant/equipment, and that the item must not be operated.  A Danger Tag is not in itself an effective isolation device, only a Safety Lock is.  Therefore, Danger Tags must only be used in conjunction with Safety Locks.   
Designated Work Group (DWG) A group of employees constituted in accordance with the Victorian Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004.  
Electrical equipment Low voltage single-phase and polyphase electrical equipment, connected to the electrical supply by a flexible cord or connecting device.  Typical examples include extension cords and power boards, portable electrical tools, office equipment, electrical kitchen appliances, etc.  
Emergency Any sudden danger that requires immediate action to prevent severe injury, illness, damage or distress.  Examples include:
• uncontrolled fires;
• life threatening injuries and illnesses, and the threat of such injuries and illnesses;
• serious spillages or releases of dangerous goods.
Emergency Control Personnel Any employee of the University who has been appointed under the Incident and Emergency Management Procedureor under the local adaptations of this procedure to the function of Campus Warden, Area Warden or Deputies.  Refer to the Emergency Control Personnel Record.  During emergencies, evacuations and practice drills, the Campus Warden and Deputy Campus Warden wear white helmets; the Area Wardens and Deputy Area Wardens wear yellow helmets or vests.
Emergency Services the Country Fire Authority (CFA), Police Victoria, Ambulance Victoria and the State Emergency Service (SES).
Environment The physical, legal, psychological, social and organisational environments in which University activities take place.  
Equipment All portable tools, appliances and implements other than plant that are connected to at least one source of energy.  This includes household and office electrical/gas appliances, laboratory instruments, portable powered tools, welding gear, passenger vehicles, etc.  
Fall hazard The potential for a person to fall more than two metres.  Such a fall may occur from a height greater than two metres, but also down a pit or shaft deeper than two metres.
Hazard The potential to cause harm to a person or to the natural environment.  
Hazards management The structured process of hazard identification, risk assessment and control aimed at providing a safe and healthy environment for employees, contractors, students, customers and visitors whilst on University premises or whilst engaged in University activities.  
Health and Safety Functions Functions assigned to specific employees under health and safety policies and procedures of the University.  The functions of Emergency Control Personnel (Area and Campus Wardens and their deputies),Health and Safety Representatives, University First Aiders, and members of Health and Safety Teams are included.  The health and safety responsibilities of Managers and Supervisors are not included in this definition.  
Health and Safety issue Any condition or event associated with the work of University employees that is, or is perceived to be, hazardous.  
Health and Safety Representative / HSR An employee of the University who has been elected to the position of Representative in accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004.
Incident Any unplanned event that causes (or has the potential to cause) an injury or illness and/or damage to equipment, buildings, plant or the natural environment.  Incidents range from near-miss incidents to serious incidents and emergencies.
Injury or illness Any injury or illness incurred by any person (called casualty) whilst present on grounds of the University or engaged in University-endorsed activities.  It includes the recurrence or aggravation of any pre-existing injury or illness, and any illness that becomes apparent on University grounds, even if unrelated to the University.
Lock and Tag Register This register records the issuing of Safety Locks, Danger Tags and Out of Service Tags.  It is kept in the Facilities Services office at each campus, and is maintained by Facilities Services.  
Management Representative A member of the management of the University who has been nominated as such, in accordance with regulation 2.2.2(1) of the OHS Regulations 2007.  For the purpose of resolving health and safety issues, Deans/Directors or Safety Officers, where appointed, are the nominated Management Representatives.  If the Dean/Director or Safety Officer cannot be contacted within a reasonable time, the relevant Deputy Vice-Chancellor or Chief Operating Officer will be deemed to be the Management Representative for the resolution of that issue. 
New Used to describe plant or substances that have not been previously introduced within the University under the proposed conditions.  It covers plant and substances that have never been introduced on site or have been introduced, but for different purposes, in different quantities, in different areas, etc.  
Operational risk An event that may adversely impact on a School's/Directorate's/Centre’s ability to achieve its key objectives.  
Out of Service Tag This tag indicates that plant/equipment is not operating correctly or is not ready to be operated and may be unsafe.   Any person can place an Out of Service Tag on plant/equipment if they consider it to be unserviceable or unsafe, but they must immediately contact Facilities Services to report the matter and update the Lock and Tag Register.  Other people must not attempt to operate “Out of Service” plant/equipment until all faults have been rectified, and the Out of Service Tag has been removed by the person whose name appears on the tag
Plant All machinery, fixed appliances and services.  This includes cranes, hoists, lifts and forklifts, presses, workshop machinery, farming machinery, processing machinery, conveyors, pumps, engines and motors, industrial vehicles, fixed pipe work, electrical installations and cabling, etc.  It does not include road-registered vehicles, household consumer goods (e.g. kitchen refrigerators or microwave ovens), common hand-held tools (drills, sanders, angle grinders, etc), portable items (mobile phones, hand-held instruments, etc), and general office furniture and equipment (e.g. desktop computers, printers), except where these items contain or generate a substance.  
Readily available In the context of the First Aid Services Procedure, University First Aiders are deemed to be readily available if they:
• can be easily and reliably contacted;
• hold a position that does not frequently cause them to be absent from the area or group they serve; and
• are sufficiently mobile to proceed rapidly to an incident scene that may be some distance away.
Reasonably practicable (for risk control) Means practicable having regard to:
• the severity of the hazard or risk in question;
• the state of knowledge about that hazard or risk and any ways of removing or mitigating that risk;
• the availability and suitability of ways to remove or mitigate that hazard or risk; and
• the cost of removing or mitigating that hazard or risk.
Risk A combination of the likelihood and severity of harm arising from a hazard.  
Risk assessment The process of evaluating likelihood and severity of harm arising from a hazard. 
Risk control The process of implementing measures to reduce, as far as reasonably practicable, the risk associated with a hazard.  The control process must follow the risk control hierarchy, in order, as prescribed in health and safety legislation.  It is important that control measures do not introduce new hazards, and that the ongoing effectiveness of the controls is monitored.  
Risk control hierarchy Ranks risk control measures in decreasing order of effectiveness:
• elimination of hazard;
• substitution of hazardous processes or materials with safer ones;
• engineering controls;
• administrative controls; and
• personal protective equipment.
The risk control measures implemented for the hazards identified should always aim to be as high on the list as practicable. 
Risk management The processes addressing the identification, assessment and treatment of strategic and operational risks.  
Safety Hasp A device used in conjunction with Safety Locks when more than one person is working on an item of plant.  It allows each worker to lock the isolation point so that it can only be turned back on when all Locks have been removed.  
Safety Lock Safety Locks are used as a physical form of protection for people working on plant or equipment.  They are used to lock out energy sources and other hazards that could pose a risk to people.  Each Safety Lock is issued to an individual worker.  It has only one key.  Once fitted to an item of plant or equipment, it must only be removed by the individual worker to whom it was issued.
Senior Manager Dean, Director, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Chief Operating Officer, and the Vice-Chancellor.  
Serious incident :  An incident which results in:
• the death of any person; or
• a person requiring medical treatment within 48 hours of being exposed to a substance; or
• a person requiring immediate hospital treatment as an in-patient in a hospital; or
• a person requiring immediate medical treatment for:
• amputation;
• serious head injury;
• serious eye injury;
• separation of skin from underlying tissue (for example de-gloving or scalping);
• electric shock;
• spinal injury;
• loss of bodily function; or
• serious laceration.
It also includes dangerous occurrences which seriously endanger the lives or the health and safety of people in the immediate vicinity.  Such dangerous occurrences include:
• collapse, overturning, failure or malfunction of, or damage to, items of plant such as cranes, scaffolds, boilers etc;
• collapse or failure of an excavation or the shoring support of an excavation;
• collapse of a building or structure;
• implosion, explosion or fire;
• escape, spillage or leakage of substances.
Staff member in charge (of a student excursion) The member of University Staff accompanying a student excursion who bears the primary responsibility for supervising the excursion and its participants.  Usually, the Staff Member in Charge is the most senior teacher/lecturer taking part in the excursion.  
Strategic risk An event that may adversely impact on the University's ability to achieve its key strategic objectives.  
Student excursion A trip away from a campus of the University conducted for a group of students for purposes related to achieving the learning outcomes of the course/program.  An "overnight excursion" is one that starts on a given day and finishes on the following day or later. 
Substance All chemicals and materials, in any physical form (liquid, solid, powder, gas, mixtures, etc), used in the course of employees' or contractors' work.  It includes, but is not limited to, compressed gases, solvents, radioactive substances, building materials, pesticides, laboratory chemicals, and cleaning chemicals.  It excludes cooking ingredients used in food preparation, first-aid products and pharmaceuticals used under qualified supervision.  
Supervisor / Manager Any employee of the University – irrespective of their position title -- who:
• plans, organises or supervises the activities of other employees, contractors, students or visitors on behalf of the University; or
• designs or organises the design of new/refurbished facilities for the University.
The terms "Supervisor" and "Manager" include Senior Managers.
University activity Any program, service, operation, project and event conducted under the auspices of the University for educational, research, commercial and other purposes, whatever its location.  
University community All people who are associated with University activities, including employees, students, contractors, customers, visitors, and occupiers of premises owned or managed by the University.  
University contact Any employee of the University who organises or supervises the presence of contractors or visitors on University grounds.
University First Aider An employee of the University who:
• holds a senior first aid certificate (often referred to as a level 2 first aid qualification) or its competency-based equivalent HLTFA301B Apply First Aid, or an equivalent qualification as determined by the Manager - Risk, Health and Safety; and
• is included in the University First Aiders Record.
Very minor injury or illness An injury or illness that only causes discomfort or short-term pain, has no lasting effect, has no foreseeable potential to worsen, and was caused by trivial and isolated causes.  Typical examples include paper cuts, small bumps and bruises, minor scratches, temporary headaches or indispositions, etc.
Work (for Lock Out / Tag Out requirements) All tasks involving inspection, repair, maintenance, adjustments, modifications or cleaning of plant/equipment.  This term does not cover the normal operation of plant or equipment.  
Work at Height Any task that an employee, contractor or student undertakes in the context of occupational, educational, research, commercial, or other University-endorsed activities, whatever the location, where a fall hazard has been identified.  Sporting activities and theatrical performances are not included within the scope of the Work at Height Procedure.  However: • whilst the sporting activities and theatrical performances themselves are not included, all work at height associated with setting up, maintaining, and dismantling sporting equipment, theatrical props, lighting, etc, is included; and • the general requirement for HIRAC reviews as described in the Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment and Control (HIRAC) Procedure still applies if any hazard, such as a fall hazard, is present in the sporting activity or theatrical performance.  
Workplace change A change that may affect the health or safety of University employees, and which relates to:
• a workplace under the management and control of the University;
• the plant, substances or other things used at such a workplace; or
• the conduct of the work performed at such a workplace.