Purchasing & Procurement

Procurement of Goods and Services Procedure

Policy Code: FN1454

Purpose

The purpose of this procedure is to communicate the strategic approach to procurement and integration of this activity across the University. This procedure outlines the obligations of staff to ensure consistent procurement practices across the University and defines the university’s operational approach to procurement.

It establishes the directions that must be implemented relating to the procurement of goods and services by the University. The University is required to implement and maintain an effective internal control framework over procurement activities.

Scope

This procedure applies to the acquisition of all goods and services by University staff, students or contractors either purchased or leased from vendors, for and on behalf of the University (including University controlled entities).

The procurement of goods and services must also:

  • Only relate to business of the university and must not be of a personal nature
  • Be approved in accordance with the university’s Delegations of Authority Policy

Legislative Context

The establishment and maintenance of financial management policies and procedures is required by Direction 3.1.3 of the Minister for Finance Directions that are regulated under the Financial Management Act 1994. More specifically, this policy is required by clause 3.4.5 of the Directions of the Minister for Finance under this Act.

Financial Management Act 1994

Federation University Australia Act 2010

Definitions

Term Definition
Approved Supplier Finance check carried out but no contracts are in place between the University and Supplier due to no competitive selection process being carried out.
Audit and Risk committee Committee of University Council.
Conflict of Interest

A conflict of interest is a conflict between a member of the University Community’s public duty to act in the best interests of the University and their private interests.  A conflict of interest exists whether it is:

  • actual – it currently exists;
  • potential – it may arise, given the circumstances;
  • perceived – members of the public could reasonably form the view that a conflict exists, or could arise, that may improperly influence the performance of their duties to the University, now or in the future.
Contracted Supplier A Supplier appointed as a result of policy compliant procurement process or in accordance with this policy and for which there is an agreement between the University and the Supplier to supply specified goods and/or services on agreed terms. This includes contracts available to the University from the Victorian Government or other consortiums and buying groups of which the University is a member.
Delegated Authorities Financial delegation in accordance with the Delegations - Contract, Financial, Staffing and Tender Policy.
Environmental Issues Environmental issues cover all environmental impacts of goods and services from cradle to grave including: reducing the number of goods and/or services purchased; minimising energy, water and materials; recycled, recyclable, biodegradable and reusable components; minimal packaging, maintenance, waste, emissions, chemicals and transportation; and environmentally responsible disposal.
Financial Records University Financial Management System General Ledger incorporating subsidiary ledgers as maintained by the Finance department.
Gratuity

A token offering provided in return for a voluntarily service as a sign of appreciation for providing the service.

There must not be any expectation of payment of value by the recipient for the service they provide, at the time of providing the service.

Locally Sourced The sourcing, purchasing or procurement  of food, ingredients and other consumable products from within a specific radius (distance) from where they will be used or sourced, or from a given geographical area.
Open & Fair An open competitive procurement process ensures fair and ethical treatment of bids from suppliers. The traditional competitive procurement process allows all interested parties to submit a bid for a job, complete with all required documentation to compete fairly for jobs.
Panel Is an arrangement whereby specific suppliers, usually selected through a single procurement process, may supply goods or services to the University.
Policy A procurement policy helps to ensure that the University can buy efficiently and obtain value for money from its suppliers.

Independent Contractor

 

An Independent Contractor is an individual, business or corporation that provides services to the University under a written contract. They bear the responsibility for payment of all taxes, superannuation and workcover.  They must hold a relevant current certificate of currency of insurances.
Probity The evidence of ethical behaviour in the procurement process. Defined as complete and confirmed integrity, uprightness and honesty. It contributes to sound procurement processes that accord equal opportunities for all participants. A good outcome is achieved when probity is applied with common sense. Probity should be integrated into all procurement planning and should not be a separate consideration. Procurement decisions are to be made in a transparent manner, which allows them to be understood and justified subsequently, and ensure that it is conducted in a transparent, honest, fair and competitive manner. Risk management of probity in the procurement process requires a higher level of control and mitigation over the procurement process where there is a higher likelihood of exposure to claims about the process. A probity advisor and/or auditor may be appointed to advise on or review the procurement activity.
Procurement Process of acquiring goods on behalf of the University and the department established by the University and promote and oversee best practice processes for goods and services purchased by the University and ensure value for money.
Purchasing The process of placing orders and buying goods or services for the University.
Purchasing Card An official University corporate credit card available to University Staff members with a Financial Delegation.
Purchase Order A University buyer generated document that authorises purchase transactions which, when accepted by the supplier, becomes an agreement binding on both parties.
Quotation A formal statement or offer made in response to an invitation to supply specified goods or services, and which contains an estimated cost for the goods or service.

Request for

Tender

An invitation to others to make an offer or proposal for the supply of goods or services, which is made in order to attract tender responses.

Select Tendering

The process whereby specifically identified suppliers are invited to tender for the provision of goods or services, based upon market considerations.
Standing Purchase Order Standing Orders are used to create a Purchase Order for recurring goods/services (e.g.sub-contracts, temp services, equipment maintenance services). A standing purchase order can accommodate multiple invoices over an extended period of time.
Social Procurement Procurement activity that takes into consideration the real or potential impacts associated with the production or sale of goods and/or services including: health, safety, human rights, ethical production, social justice, indigenous businesses, fair trade, diversity, access, and purchasing locally and domestically made goods and/or services.
Sole Supplier When there is only one possible supplier for the required goods and/or services. This is to be evidenced by an appropriate market analysis and assessment. If there is a dispute about whether or not there is a Sole Supplier the assessment shall be determined by Procurement and Director, Finance.
Supplier (s) An external that supplies goods or services entity to the University.
Sustainable Procurement Is the meeting of business needs for materials, goods, utilities and services in an environmentally-friendly, responsible and ethical way. Supply chain sustainability is integral to sustainable procurement.
Tender Response An offer made in writing in response to a Request for Tender.
Threshold Value The value to be applied on the anticipated total expenditure, accumulated over the total term of the contract, in Australian Dollars and exclusive of GST. If the term is unspecified then a nominal term of three years is to be used for calculating the Threshold Value.
Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Involves all costs associated with ownership and is based on the whole of lifecycle analysis. TCO is calculated over the whole life of the procurement and contract lifecycle. It estimates the accumulated costs of acquiring, operating, maintaining and disposing or decommissioning procured goods or services.
Value for Money (VFM) The achievement of a desired procurement outcome at the best possible price (not necessarily the lowest price) based on a balanced judgement of financial and non-financial factors relevant to the procurement. VFM may take into account the Total Cost of Ownership and a mix of quality, costs and resources, as well as fitness for purpose, timelines and risk.

Actions

Effective internal control procedures must be implemented and maintained by the University to ensure all procurement activities of the University are authorised in accordance with the delegated authorities and business requirements within a documented procurement framework.

Procurement to purchasing activities within the University includes ethical, compliance and financial obligations, as well as opportunities for financial savings, improved sustainability, service and quality. The University must ensure the following procurement principles are adhered to:

  • Value for Money (low environmental and social impacts)
  • Accountability and Maintain comprehensive and well documented records
  • Open and Fair Competition (Quotation and Tender processes adhered to)
  • Risk Management.
  • Safety.
  • Probity and Transparency
  • Innovation
  • Customer Service
  • Reductions in the administrative costs of procurement processes
  • Improved purchasing efficiency and control (avoid unnecessary consumption)
  • Electronic transaction data for reporting, analysis and control
  • Comply with any and all directions regarding the use of University contracted suppliers
  • Comply with Conflict of Interest Policy and Conflict of Interest Procedure

There must be sufficient justification to demonstrate that there is a need for the goods and services to be provided and that the economical and sustainability considerations have been fully considered prior to the purchase of any goods and / or services.

The University acknowledges its role and responsibility to support staff and relevant stakeholders in developing and maintaining awareness, understanding and competency in relation to sustainable, social and locally sourced procurement practices.

Roles and Responsibilities

Procurement

Procurement is responsible for coordinating all procurement activity across the University, setting procurement policy and procedures and providing strategic sourcing support advice and tools to the University.

Financial Services

Financial Services Hub staff are responsible for processing purchase requests and goods receipting, Invoice receipting, timely payment to suppliers and payment of direct invoices and accounts receivable.

University Staff

University staff engaging in any procurement activities are required to comply with this procedure and associated local business process.

Segregation of Duties

Segregation of duties refers to the clear and distinct roles of each staff member in a procurement process. All staff involved in a procurement process are responsible for ensuring the sufficient segregation of duties occurs. Staff must ensure that they do not fulfil more than one key procurement role, where practicable.

Contracted Suppliers

A Contracted Supplier or a Panel of Contracted Suppliers may be appointed pursuant to a competitive process in accordance with the Procurement of Goods and Services Policy and this procedure.

Where goods or services are required for which the University has appointed a Contracted Supplier(s), that Contracted Supplier(s) must be used unless they are unable to supply the specified goods or services as and when required

Where agreed pricing from a Contracted Supplier reasonably covers the specific requirements of a procurement process, it is not necessary to seek/obtain Quotations. Where estimated pricing does not reasonably cover the specific requirements of a procurement process, the Threshold Value requirements set out in Table 1 do not apply, however it will be necessary to seek/obtain Quotations from two or more of the panel of Contracted Suppliers for expenditure between $50,000 and $350,000 and from three or more of the panel of Contracted Suppliers for expenditure above $350,000 to ensure competitive pricing is obtained.

Where a Contracted Supplier(s) is unable to supply the specified goods or services as and when required an exemption must be sought and approved in accordance with the Procurement of Goods and Services Policy and this procedure prior to engaging the broader market.

Thresholds and Processes

The following processes are a guide to the minimum requirements for procurement of goods and services for the University. Each procurement activity should be assessed for risk and complexity to determine if a more competitive and/or robust process should be used, such as a formal tender irrespective of value. The Threshold Values are to be applied on the anticipated total expenditure, accumulated over the total term of the contract, are in Australian Dollars and are exclusive of GST.

There may be extenuating circumstances where an exemption to the Procurement Policy is required. Refer to Exemptions to the Thresholds and Processes.

Purchases less than $50,000

For purchases less than $50,000, a minimum of one documented Quotation is required.

Purchases: $50,000 and up to $350,000

For purchases $50,000 and up to $350,000 a minimum of three written Quotations are required. The general process for obtaining three quotes is as follows:

  • Detail a set of requirements for the goods or services.
  • Issue a request for quote to a select set of suppliers identified as capable of fulfilling the requirements.
  • Assess the responses according to the requirements and the value for money proposition.

If a successful supplier is determined, a purchase request is to be raised and all quotes are to be attached.

Corporate Governance is to be consulted if deviation from standard University contract agreements is to apply.

Purchases: $350,000 and above

For purchases $350,000,and above a Tender Process is required. The general process for a tender is as follows:

A Procurement Plan is drafted outlining the proposed market engagement and sourcing strategy.

The Procurement Plan will specify if an open or closed/select Request for Tender will be utilised. Appropriate justification must be defined in the sourcing strategy.

Reasons for a closed/select tender may include where the University already has considerable knowledge of the goods or services being purchased and has conducted an appropriate market analysis and assessment including a reasonable shortlist of potential Suppliers.

A Tender Evaluation Panel is nominated in the Procurement Plan. Refer to Tender Evaluation Panel Roles and Responsibilities.

An Evaluation Plan is completed in the Procurement Plan or created as a separate document if required (eg. for high-value and/or high-risk procurements).

The Procurement Plan is submitted to the relevant authorised delegate for approval, as per Delegations Bands – Value Limit table.

For strategic projects, a business case must also be developed and approved by the relevant authorised delegate. A comprehensive specification and/or statement of requirements is created.

Conflict of Interest forms must be signed off by the nominated Tender Evaluation Panel as per the approved Procurement Plan.

Tender documents are published via an eTendering portal by an authorised Procurement representative and clarifications are managed through the portal.

Responses are received and distributed to the Tender Evaluation Panel for assessment as per the evaluation matrix in the approved Procurement Plan.

Mandatory Criteria are to be assessed first, with any non-compliant submissions as agreed by the Tender Evaluation Panel eliminated.

The Tender Evaluation Panel generally nominate a shortlist, then a preferred supplier. Negotiations and contract departures are conducted by the staff nominated in the Procurement Plan.

Negotiations must be conducted in a fair and transparent manner.

Supply chain limitations and any outsourcing or offshoring limitations are considered and the risks andresponsibilities are cascaded down the supply chain.

The chair of the Tender Panel produces a Procurement Report that is submitted to the relevant authorised delegate for approval as per per Delegations Bands – Value Limit table.

Following approval by the relevant authorised delegate, the successful supplier is advised, with the contract issued for signing.

After both parties have signed, a purchase request is to be processed with the Procurement Report and signed contract attached.

Unsuccessful tenderers are notified in writing that their response was unsuccessful.

Offer Evaluation

Background

Setting appropriately weighted evaluation criteria is critical in ensuring a successful procurement. Evaluations must be carried out in an objective manner that is fair to all parties and uses a methodology that is fair and transparent.

Evaluation criteria are generally classified into two categories:

  • Mandatory Criteria: these are pass/fail criteria. Any supplier that doesn't meet these must be disqualified.
  • Comparative Criteria: these are assessed against a pre-defined weighting that is determined according to the complexity, risk and type of procurement. These are typically both qualitative and quantitative measures.

The evaluation criteria and weightings are to be detailed in the approved Procurement Plan.

Commercial compliance criteria will generally be assessed as comply / does not comply / partially comply and then generally taken into consideration during the determination of value for money. These are not elimination criteria.

Commercial compliance criteria may include:

  • Quality Management
  • Occupational Health and Safety
  • Financial Viability
  • Risk and Insurance
  • Compliance to Conditions of Contract
  • Conflict of Interest

Purchases between $50,000 and $350,000

There is no obligation to follow a set of pre-defined evaluation criteria for obtaining three written Quotations. Each procurement should be assessed according to risk and complexity in determining evaluation criteria and the respective weightings. As a guide, the following factors should be considered at a minimum:

  • Value for money
  • Compliance to specification
  • Commercial compliance criteria

Purchases over $350,000

Evaluation criteria and the respective weightings for use in a Tender Process are required to be approved in a Procurement Plan. Weightings are to be categorised by procurement type. These should be considered as the primary weightings with amendments made on an as required basis.

Exemptons to the Thresholds and Processes

If there is an instance where the standard procurement thresholds and processes are not appropriate, staff can request an exemption to the procurement policy and procedure.

Exemptions to the procurement policy and procedures may only be sought in exceptional circumstances based on business necessity and merit (such as instances of genuine commercial or confidential matters) or cases of extreme urgency, and cannot be used for avoiding competition.

An exemption to this policy and procedure may be granted to:

  • access contracts available to the University from the Victorian Government or other consortiums and buying groups of which the University is a member (such as CAUDIT and Procurement Australia).
  • use an alternative to an Contracted Supplier or a Panel of Contracted Suppliers
  • use an alternative to the Threshold Value requirements
  • use a Sole Supplier (Exceptions may exist when an Individual/Sole Trader is engaged)

A request for an exemption to the procurement policy and procedure must meet one or more of the following categories to be considered:

  • the Contracted Supplier or Panel of Contracted Suppliers cannot supply the goods and/or services required
  • demonstrated unique technical requirements with only one Sole Supplier in the market
  • standardisation of existing goods or services
  • time-critical events that have been caused by unforeseen circumstances
  • other exceptional circumstances based on business necessity as assessed by Procurement

A request for an exemption to the procurement policy and procedure is not required for the following goods and/or services and as such these are deemed exempt from the procurement thresholds and processes. For the avoidance of doubt, each of the following activities are still required to demonstrate value for money and require approval from the relevant authorised delegate(s):

  • leasing of land and/or buildings
  • payments relating to research grants  
  • wages and other associated on-costs
  • third-party payments that the University novates the procurement to another entity under contract
  • donations

Tender Evaluation Panel Roles and Responsibilities

The Tender Evaluation Panel has the important role of determining which supplier is able to meet the selection criteria and provides the best Value for Money for the University.

The Tender Evaluation Panel members must have adequate technical and operational knowledge and background about the goods and/or services required such that they are capable of providing meaningful input to the Tender process.

The Tender Evaluation Panel identified in the Procurement Plan will:

  • Provide input to the tender documentation, prior to release to tenderers.
  • Provide input to establish the evaluation criteria that will be used to assess the offers from tenderers.
  • Assist in addressing tenderer queries for response via the eTendering tool, if required.

Following the receipt of all compliant responses, meet as a group to provide input to the evaluation of all responses using the pre-determined evaluation criteria. The assessment may be developed by one member of the panel and presented to all members for critique and approval, or the evaluation panel may decide that the initial scoring exercise is carried out individually, prior to meeting as a team for a panel discussion.

Duties of Tender Evaluation Panel Members include, but are not limited to:

  • Complete and sign a conflict of interest and confidentiality agreement declaring any actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest.
  • Must not accept any inducement, gift or hospitality from a tenderer that might compromise the integrity of the selection process.
  • Must act objectively and fairly throughout the tender process to ensure all tenderers are given an equal chance to succeed with their response and that the integrity of the process is upheld.
  • Must hold information received as part of a tenderer’s response in the strictest confidence and not release this information outside of the Tender Evaluation Panel.
  • Must not divulge information on the deliberations and decisions of the Tender Evaluation Panel until a formal recommendation has been approved by the appropriate delegate and all tenderers have been formally notified.

Selection of the Chair of the Tender Evaluation Panel

The approved Procurement Plan shall identify an appropriate Chair of a Tender Evaluation Panel.

Duties of the Chair of the Tender Evaluation Panel include, but are not limited to:

  • Assist with the selection of other members of the Tender Evaluation Panel and identify voting members of the Tender Evaluation Panel.
  • Request the Manager, Procurement to appoint a probity specialist when required.
  • Assist the relevant manager to prepare and submit the Procurement Plan document for approval, having attached approved supporting documentation including tender documents.
  • Ensure that all selected members have adequate technical, environmental and operational knowledge and background about the goods and/or services required to be able to provide meaningful input to the tender process.
  • Ensure that all members of the panel declare any conflicts prior to the commencement of the evaluation process highlighting that Tender Evaluation Panel members must disclose any actual, perceived or potential conflicts of interest through the completion of a conflict of interest and confidentiality agreement.
  • Develop and forward the recommendations of the Tender Evaluation Panel into the Procurement Report and assist the relevant manager to prepare and submit the Procurement Report document for approval, having attached approved supporting documentation including evaluation and scoring matrices.
  • Sign-off on the selection of the successful tenderer that delivers the best Value for Money to the University.
  • Ensure an accurate record is kept of the Tender Evaluation Panel's deliberations for audit purposes.
  • Once approval has been provided, inform all tenderers of the outcome of the tender process.

The Chair of the Tender Evaluation Panel is to seek consensus on recommendations where possible. In the event that consensus cannot be reached, a majority decision can be accepted and further advice can be sought from the Manager, Procurement if needed.

eTendering

To maintain effective probity, the University requires the use of an eTendering portal that supports the distribution of tender documents to potential suppliers and enables the lodgement of tenderer responses via the portal. Procurement maintain access to, and provide assistance in the use of the eTendering portal.

Probity and Ethics

Probity is the evidence of ethical behaviour in a particular process. Probity is defined as complete and confirmed integrity, uprightness and honesty. It contributes to sound procurement processes that accord equal opportunities for all participants.

Probity should be integrated into all procurement planning and should not be a separate consideration. Risk management of probity in the procurement process requires a higher level of control (mitigation) over the procurement process where there is a higher likelihood of exposure to claims about the process. Requests for probity advice are to be referred to the Manager, Procurement. The Manager, Procurement has the authority to decide whether the complexity and sensitivity of a project may warrant the appointment of a probity auditor.In summary, procurement decisions are to be made in a transparent manner, which allows them to be understood and justified subsequently.

There are five essential probity principles to achieve procedural fairness. All University procurement activities must be based upon these principles throughout all stages of the procurement process:

  • open competitive process
  • fairness, consistency and transparency of process
  • identification and resolution of conflicts of interest
  • accountability in relation to decision making
  • monitoring and evaluating performance

Probity is integral to:

  • ensure conformity to processes designed to achieve value for money
  • provide accountability
  • ensure that all bids will be assessed against the same criteria
  • preserve public and participant confidence in Federation University processes
  • improve defensibility of decisions to potential legal challenge or other external scrutiny

The benefits of probity include:

  • avoidance of conflicts/problems
  • avoidance of corrupt practices
  • better outcomes against stated objectives
  • improvements in organisational and attitudinal change
  • reassurance to the community and those wishing to do business with the University that the process and outcome can be trusted
  • provision of an objective and independent view on the probity of the process
  • minimisation of potential for litigation

Conflict of Interest & Gifts, Benefits and Hospitality

Any perceived, potential or actual conflict of interest in the purchase of goods or services must be acknowledged and managed in accordance with the University's Conflict of Interest Procedure and/or the University's Gifts, Benefits, Hospitality, Food and Beverages Policy.

Individuals actively involved in a tender process are not to accept any hospitality, meals, participation at events (whether paid for or not), or gifts, including items of a trivial or seasonal nature (eg. promotional calendars, diaries, pens etc). Solicitation or acceptance of gifts, benefits and hospitality during a tender process creates conflict of interest and a perception of unfair treatment.

Document Retention

Retention periods for procurement documents are detailed in the Records Management section of this procedure.

Document retention will assist in ensuring conformity to processes, accountability, preserving confidence in Federation University processes, and will improve defensibility of procurement decisions.

Records are to be protected equivalently in all forms (electronically, paper, USB memory sticks, CDs etc) and at all times (including at rest, in transit, in envelopes etc).

Contract Management

Contract Management Responsibilities

Contract management planning should commence during the procurement planning stage and is to be reviewed and updated throughout the procurement process. Contracts are to be managed over the life of the agreement. At the procurement planning stage, consideration is to be given to:

  • who will manage the contract
  • how the contractor's performance will be monitored
  • what are the risks associated with the contract
  • how will the contract risks be managed during the course of the contract
  • reporting required from the contractor

The above can be summarised in a Procurement Plan that should be reviewed at an appropriate interval, and in-line with the criticality of the contract (annually at a minimum). At the beginning of the contract management phase, the contract manager should identify the critical clauses in the contract and any other requirements that may influence the management of the contract.

Contract Management activities may include:

  • reviewing and monitoring of key performance indicators (KPIs)
  • contract progress
  • monitoring contract financials
  • managing review meetings
  • dentifying high sustainability risk issues and improvements
  • managing resolution of issues
  • resolving disputes
  • documenting variations

Contract Relationship Management Objectives

Contract Management requires establishment of mutually beneficial relationships with key suppliers and stakeholders (internal and external). The main objective of procurement relationship management is to establish two-way, mutually beneficial relationships between procurement staff, suppliers and stakeholders. It consists of collaborative and relationship-building activities targeted at the most strategic and critical supply partners.

Contract Relationship Management activities include:

  • reducing prices and increasing efficiency beyond traditional sourcing and category management efforts by setting up long-term relationships and communications
  • managing supplier risk and compliance by improving transparency and on key relationships through category management (Risk Management Procedures are located on the intranet)
  • driving supplier performance in a transparent and sustainable manner with strategic suppliers
  • enabling continuous improvement of operations through long-term relationships with suppliers, allowing for the creation of a more effective and efficient contract management relationship
  • exploring business development and innovation opportunities

Please note when engaging an Independent Contractor, further advice must be sought prior to engaging. Independent Contractors are not within the normal scope of contract management.

Responsibility

The COO/CFO (as the Approval Authority) is responsible for monitoring the implementation, outcomes and scheduled review of this procedure

The Manager, Procurement (as the Policy Sponsor) is responsible for maintaining the content of this procedure as delegated by the (title above)

Promulgation

The Procurement of Goods and Services Procedure wll be communicated throughout the University community in the form of:

  1. an Announcement Notice via FedNews website and on the ‘Recently Approved Documents’ page on the ‘Policies, Procedures and Forms @ the University’ website to alert the University-wide community of the approved Procedure;
  2. distribution of e-mails to Head of School / Head of Department / University staff; and/or
  3. documentation distribution, eg posters, brochures.

Implementation

The Procurement of Goods and Services Procedure will be implemented throughout the University via:

1. Announcement on the FedNews website;

2. ‘Recently Approved Documents’ webpage to alert the University-wide community of the approved procedure;

3. Information/Training Sessions; and/or

4. Inclusion in the University's online Policy Library;

5. Distribution of e-mails to relevant University Staff and Stakeholder.

Records Management

Title Location Responsible Officer Minimum Retention Period
Financial System Authorised User - Applications Financial Operations Senior Accountant Finance Systems 7 Years
Supplier Applications Financial Operations Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years
Requisition Form School or Section entering the Purchase Requisition/Order Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years
Purchase Order Financial Operations Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years
Receiving authority Receiving Area Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years
Financial Delegation Finance Operations Director, Finance Permanent
Partial Delivery Notification Accounts Payable -Mt. Helen Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years
Equipment Approval Form Financial Operations Associate Director, Corporate Finance 7 Years
Quotations School or Section entering the Purchase Requisition/Order Manager, Financial Operations 7 Years