Student Plagiarism

Student Plagiarism Procedure

Policy Code: LT1513

Purpose

This procedure is to provide a systematic approach to the treatment of plagiarism in academic work at the University, in accordance with Regulation 6.1.1 – Plagiarism.  This procedure sets out the processes for reporting, recording, adjudicating and penalising incidents of student plagiarism.

Plagiarism is a form of cheating and is a very serious academic offence that may lead to exclusion from the University.  Plagiarised material can be drawn from, and presented in, written, graphic, auditory and visual form, including electronic data, and oral presentations.  Plagiarism occurs when the origin of the material used is not appropriately cited.

The objective of this procedure is to provide a positive learning environment for all students that encourages academic integrity, originality and literacy amongst students in a way that reflect the values of the University and rewards academic excellence.  This is undertaken by:

  • Adequately and consistently educating students in how to correctly research, present and reference their work in an Australian educational environment.
  • Ensuring that students are clearly informed of what constitutes plagiarism and that it is an unacceptable academic practice.
  • Developing innovative approaches to assessment that may reduce the opportunities for students to plagiarise as well as promote better learning outcomes.
  • Supplying students with information on how to avoid plagiarism and how to access information on correctly preparing their work.
  • Providing a fair and consistent approach to managing cases of alleged plagiarism within Faculties/Centres.
  • Making available a software service that allows students to self-assess their work for originality and referencing and citation omissions.
  • Ensuring that the penalties for plagiarism are clear and readily understood by staff and students.

Definitions

Term Definition
Assessor: Person, or persons, responsible at the Faculty or partner provider for the assessment or moderation of student work.
Boolean Search: Type of search allowing users to combine keywords with operators such as AND, NOT and OR to further produce more relevant results. For example, a Boolean search could be "hotel" AND "New York". This would limit the search results to only those documents containing the two keywords.
Cheating:

Is an intention to gain an unfair advantage in the assessment of or entry to a unit or course. This may include (but is not limited to) the following:

  • resubmitting or largely reusing previously assessed work;
  • fabrication or falsification of data and /or results;
  • presenting work, which is the outcome of directly working with others, as his or her own (collusion);
  • allowing another person to complete an assessment or examination on behalf of a student;
  • accessing/obtaining an advance copy of an examination paper unless otherwise authorised (for example a 'seen' paper);
  • communicating with, or copying from, another person(s) during an examination;
  • bringing into, or receiving during, an examination unauthorised material/information;
  • presenting untrue medical/special consideration forms;
  • knowingly helping others to cheat;
  • taking actions which intrude on the ability of others to complete their assessable tasks.
Collusion: The unauthorised act of a student presenting work, which is the outcome of directly working with others, as his or her own.
Common Knowledge: A commonly agreed knowledge/fact that is from numerous sources and generally undisputed. For example, 'the Earth is the third planet from the Sun'. It may also include general folklore, traditions, observations or aphorisms, such as 'Count Dracula lived in Transylvania' or that 'Life wasn't meant to be easy'. Common Knowledge does not usually require a citation.
Cooperative Learning: The informal process of students interacting to enhance their learning outcomes, which is encouraged.
Group-work: The authorised act of a group of students producing either a common assessable work or work as part of a larger project.
Integrity in Assessment: Is achieved when students receive proper credit for assessable work which is clearly their own.
Intentional Plagiarism Intentional plagiarism occurs when a student knows that he or she is passing off someone else's words, material, works or ideas as their own in order to gain an advantage or avoid work.
Plagiarism: The presentation of the works of another person/other persons as though they are one’s own by failing to properly acknowledge that person/those persons. Proper acknowledgement means to clearly identify which parts of a work originate from which source.
Plagiarism Detection Software: The online web-based text-matching software that works by comparing electronically submitted papers to content located on the Internet and proprietary databases as well as the work of other students whose papers have also been submitted into the system.
Plagiarism Officer (PO): Person, or persons, responsible at the Faculty/Centre for investigating plagiarism. Also referred to within the document as PO.
Poor Referencing: The presentation of works of another person/other persons with incorrect/inadequate attribution to those person(s). Poor referencing can be considered as a lesser form of plagiarism where the student(s) was not attempting to gain an unfair advantage. Generally, if an attempt is made to indicate that the student has taken the idea from another source then it should be treated as poor referencing (eg. quotation marks but no citation). If there is no attempt made to indicate that a particular part of a submission is from another source then it may be considered plagiarism instead of poor referencing.
Unintentional Plagiarism Unintentional plagiarism occurs when students use the words or ideas of others but fail to quote or give credit, usually because they do not know how.

Examples of Plagiarism

The following are examples of plagiarism where appropriate acknowledgement or referencing of the author or source does not occur:

  • Copying directly (or allowing to be copied) paragraphs, sentences, a single sentence or significant parts of a sentence.  A citation without quotation marks around the copied text may also constitute plagiarism;
  • Copying ideas, concepts, research results, statistical tables, computer programs, designs, images sounds or text or any combination of these;
  • Paraphrasing of another’s work closely, or parts of these, with minor changes but with the essential meaning, form and/or progression of ideas maintained;
  • Relying on a specific idea or interpretation that is not one’s own without identifying whose idea or interpretation it is;
  • Cutting or pasting statements from multiple sources or piecing together work of others and representing them as original work;
  • Presenting as independent, work done in collaboration with other people (eg. another student, a tutor); and
  • Submitting, as one’s own, all or part of another student’s original work;
  • Submitting work purchased online or prepared by a third party as one's own.

Responsibilities

Plagiarism, either intentional or unintentional, is a practice which contradicts the University’s values of effort, excellence and integrity. There is an expectation that students will prepare and submit work that is their own, and where appropriate, acknowledge the work of others.

All academic work at the University requires the use of recognised referencing styles. Those styles acceptable to the University are detailed in the General Guide to Referencing (the Guide). Faculties/Centres must specify within the course description which style is to be used from the Guide, and any technical or discipline-specific referencing requirements. In the absence of specific instruction from the Course Coordinator or course description, students should use a style from the General Guide to Referencing. 

If the student fails to adhere to these requirements with respect to referencing, they may be considered to have:

  • poorly referenced, in which case the Course Coordinator will apply a marking penalty as detailed in the course description, assessment task or task description;
  • unintentionally plagiarised, and needs to be educated and/or penalised in accordance with the Management of Unintentional Plagiarism section of this procedure;
  • plagiarised, and be penalised in accordance of Regulation 6.1.1 and this procedure.

University Responsibilities

  • Make accessible to staff and students the legislation, policy and procedures of the University concerning plagiarism;
  • Establish processes to support the consistent implementation of University Regulation 6.1.1 relating to plagiarism;
  • Set a benchmark standard for the presentation and proper referencing of academic work;
  • Provide processes for students to appeal decisions arising from plagiarism;
  • Provide appropriate education for all students in how to correctly research, present and reference their work in the Australian educational environment;
  • Provide International students with cultural education and practical training in relation to expectations and referencing practices in the Australian tertiary environment;
  • Provide student support through the provision and use of software to allow students to develop their academic literacy skills and self-assess the content of their assessments prior to submission;
  • Support and educate staff in the development and implementation of innovative approaches to assessment that may reduce the opportunities for students to plagiarise as well as promote better learning outcomes; and
  • Maintain confidential records of previous breaches.

Faculty/Centre Responsibilities

  • Ensure the legislation and procedures of the University concerning plagiarism are known and implemented within the Faculty/Centre;
  • Support the use of appropriate referencing techniques;
  • Provide secure assignment drop off and collection facilities; and
  • Provide information to students on acceptable referencing practice, including the required referencing style.

*Educative strategies to include:

  • Creating awareness of the Universities commitment to academic honesty by inclusion of a statement concerning academic honesty in Unit Descriptions;
  • Inclusion in Unit/Course Descriptions of links/references to the University's policy/legislation on plagiarism and student conduct;
  • Advice to students on protecting their own work from theft/copying.

Staff Responsibilities

  • Know and consistently implement the legislation and procedures of the University concerning plagiarism;
  • Provide information to students about referencing requirements that are relevant to the discipline area and/or assessment task;
  • Provide information to students about referencing techniques and practice;
  • Be vigilant and consistent in the identification of possible plagiarism;
  • Provide transparent and consistent feedback to students about issues relating to referencing;
  • Take all reasonable precautions for the security of all student work within their keeping; and
  • Model best practice referencing in own practice.

*Preventive strategies to include:

Design assessment tasks that lessen the opportunity for cheating/plagiarising. For example:

  • Use essay topics that rely on analysis and evaluation rather than collection and description;
  • Do not set the same assignment topic semester after semester;
  • Use alternatives/variations to standard assignments. e.g. require students (or a sample of students) to submit progress or non-final reports on their assignments or require students to make a brief presentation (a form of invigilation) in tutorials on their assignments);
  • Where feasible make use of an oral examination (viva);
  • Avoid an excessive number of assessable tasks.

Ask students for evidence that they have not cheated/plagiarised. For example:

  • Ask students to provide library site and call number of all sources and/or include the date they accessed a particular website;
  • Collect an annotated bibliography before an assignment is due;
  • Insist on evidence for significant claims and don't assess unless provided;
  • Ask students what they learned from a particular task.
  • Making positive use of collaborative work having provisions to counter 'free riders'.
  • As appropriate, using invigilated assessments.

Student Responsibilities

  • Make every effort to reference correctly and not plagiarise;
  • Understand and comply with the legislation and procedures of the University regarding plagiarism and seek help if unclear about the requirements;
  • Be familiar with, and apply, the referencing practices acceptable to the Faculty/Centre;
  • Ensure that all sources of information are appropriately acknowledged;
  • Check and improve assessable tasks using a text matching software tool provided by the University (where relevant and available), prior to submission;
  • Take responsibility for the work that is submitted which includes taking precautions to ensure work cannot be copied, in whole or part; and
  • Actively engage and seek academic support or self-educate based on feedback provided by staff.

Support Provided to Students

Software may be utilised by students to detect plagiarism. Training and education will be made available to students on the use of any software utilised.

Student Plagiarism support can be sourced from the following:

Detection of Plagiarism

If it is suspected that plagiarism has occurred, there are a number of strategies for checking assessable work:

  • Use text, image or other media matching software;
  • Ensure all websites listed in the bibliography are current and contain the information cited;
  • Review journal articles listed in the bibliography for the information cited; and
  • Conduct a keyword or phrase search using a Boolean search on a search engine, the University Library Database for any phrases suspected of being plagiarised or use plagiarism detection software.

*Detection strategies for staff to include:

  • Becoming educated about the electronic resources available to students in their discipline;
  • Using search engine(s) to find sites that students are likely to find by using a likely search phrase;
  • Letting students know of their awareness of particular sites;
  • Making use of detection software and other deterrents;
  • Responding quickly to incidents of cheating /plagiarising in accordance with the relevant University policies and procedures.

Plagiarism Determination Guide

The general principle when enforcing Regulation 6.1.1- Plagiarism is to ensure fairness and students' well-being as much as possible. The aim is to educate and foster stronger learning environments, not to blindly punish.

Prior to reporting plagiarism, the assessor, in discussions with the relevant Plagiarism Officer, needs to consider issues such as:

  • the magnitude/seriousness of the plagiarism;
  • the likely intent of the student(s) plagiarising;
  • potential for educating the student(s) involved;
  • detrimental impacts should the student(s) be reported, such as stress or other studies;
  • fairness for both the student(s) that have plagiarised and those that have not;
  • when regarding referencing, students should be considered as novice learners if they are enrolled in their first year of studies and/or have not been in a learning environment for some time.

Example:

Students provided tabbed text as a block quote and omitted a few citations through oversight or a lack of knowledge. In consultation with the Plagiarism Officer, the assessor rates the magnitude of the issue to determine whether it is enough to warrant the charge of plagiarism and put the student through the plagiarism process.

Unintentional Plagiarism

Unintentional plagiarism occurs when students use the words or ideas of others but fail to quote or give credit, usually because they do not know how.

Examples of unintentional plagiarism include:

  • omitting a citation or citing inaccurately;
  • paraphrasing by only changing a few words without changing the sentence structure of the original text;
  • changing the sentence structure but not the words; and
  • putting quotation marks around part of a quotation but not around all of it.

Management of Unintentional Plagiarism

Reporting

If the assessor, in consultation with the Faculty’s/Centre's Plagiarism Officer, is of the opinion that the student(s) has unintentionally plagiarised, they need to consider implementing one or more of the following actions:

1. Confirm if the student has been previously reported for unintentional or intentional plagiarism.

If the student has been previously reported for plagiarism, then the assessor, in consultation with the relevant Plagiarism Officer, will treat it as Intentional Plagiarism and implement Part A, Part B or Part C of the Student Plagiarism Procedure.

If this is the student's first unintentional plagiarism incident, the assessor is to proceed to the follow actions:

2. Educate student(s) about plagiarism.

  • Use examples to discuss what plagiarism is, why it occurs and how the student can avoid plagiarism.
  • Review and/or teach skills such as summarising, paraphrasing, critical analysis, argument development, referencing and citation.
  • Explain how using these skills effectively can reduce the instances of plagiarism. Refer students to academic support services for further training and assistance.
  • Encourage student(s) to use plagiarism detection software before assignments are submitted.
  • Explain to the student(s) the meaning of the Plagiarism Statement Agreement that the student(s) have signed on their Assignment Cover Sheet and how it is a legally binding agreement with the University.
  • Take marks off in accordance with the task assessment guide; and/or
  • Set replacement assessments for the student(s).

Warnings and outcomes must be communicated in writing to the student(s) and recorded by the assessor on a Plagiarism Register, which each Faculty/Centre will determine based on their operational processes. Cases of unintentional plagiarism will not be included on the student(s) formal academic record and will be destroyed upon completion of their program.

In more serious cases, where it appears the student(s) intention was to gain an unfair advantage over other students, and in the opinion of the assessor, the above actions would not maintain fairness for other students, then the assessor may decide to formally report the student(s) for plagiarism.

Intentional Plagiarism

Intentional plagiarism occurs when a student knows that he or she is passing off someone else's words, material, works or ideas as their own in order to gain an advantage or avoid work. Purchasing pre-written research papers is one of the most blatant forms of intentional plagiarism. Other examples include copying an essay or article from the Internet, online source, or electronic database without quoting or giving credit, and cutting and pasting from more than one source to create a paper without quoting or giving credit.

The following flowchart outlines the process to be followed once the assessor has decided to lodge a formal report for plagiarism in accordance with the procedure under Regulation 6.1.1 - Plagiarism.

Student Plagiarism Flowchart

Part A - Management of Plagiarism Identification and Reporting

Due to the nature of plagiarism and the time constraints involved, Faculties/Centres need to ensure that students are notified immediately where evidence of plagiarism exists.

The University’s goal is to provide a fair and consistent approach to managing cases of alleged plagiarism and ensuring that the penalties for plagiarism are clear and readily understandable by staff and students.

At any stage of an investigation into alleged plagiarism, the student/s should be advised to remain enrolled in their program for the duration of the process, unless advised otherwise.

The steps in Part A apply to the initial reporting of a first, second or third incident of alleged plagiarism.

  STEPS RESPONSIBILITY COMMENTS
1. Determine whether a student has plagiarised an assessment task according to the Plagiarism Determination Guide.

Assessor

Refer to the previous section, Detection of Plagiarism and Plagiarism Determination Guide to assist with determining plagiarism.

If the Assessor is located at a Partner Provider, then they should contact the Course Coordinator in relation to the alleged incident. The reporting of intentional plagiarism requires submission of a Plagiarism Report to the Faculty Plagiarism Officer via the relevant Centre for University Partnerships (CUP) Liaison Officer.

2.

Prepare documentary evidence of what parts are plagiarised and original sources (if possible).

Assessor

This is a summary outlining the proposed evidence of plagiarism, to accompany the form:

Plagiarism Report - Attachment 1

3.

Contact the Executive Dean/Director or nominee (or the Plagiarism Officer) providing relevant documentation and evidence for investigation.

Assessor  
4.

Contact Central Records via email to ascertain whether the student has any previous registered plagiarism incidents.

Email: centralrecords@federation.edu.au

Plagiarism Officer (PO)

The PO must contact Central Records to establish the incident number as each occurrence carries a different penalty.

Written correspondence should include name, Faculty/Centre and position title of the staff member submitting the request.

5.

If the student has any previous plagiarism incidents, the details will be forwarded to the PO via email.

If there is no match, Central Records will inform the PO via email. The PO proceeds on the basis that it is the student’s first incident.

Central Records Central Records will only forward details relating to previous plagiarism occurrences of a specific student to the PO via email; staff will not be given access to the University’s Plagiarism Register.
6.

Once it has been determined that a student has incurred their first incident claim of plagiarism (1st, 2nd or 3rd incident), they should immediately be notified in writing of the claim, evidence, and forfeiture of credit.

**Student Support**

Students can seek assistance with their plagiarism case through the Federation University Student Advisory Service.

Students can access academic support services through the Student Futures Program, CLIPP.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee

Templates for the initial letters of notification of a first, second or third incident:

Plagiarism 1st Incident Notification – Attachment 2

Plagiarism 2nd Incident Notification – Attachment 3

Plagiarism 3rd Incident Notification - Attachment 4

Include with the above notification letters the following document:

Plagiarism Resources - Attachment 15

7.

In the instance of a first or second incident of plagiarism, proceed to Part B.

In the instance of a third incident of plagiarism, proceed to Part C.

   

Part B - Management of Plagiarism Hearing Process, 1st & 2nd Incidents

Due to the nature of the plagiarism and the time constraints involved, Faculties/Centres need to ensure that students are notified immediately where evidence of plagiarism exists

The University’s goal is to provide a fair and consistent approach to managing cases of alleged plagiarism and ensuring that the penalties for plagiarism are clear and readily understandable by staff and students.

At any stage of an investigation into alleged plagiarism, the student/s should be advised to remain enrolled in their program for the duration of the process, unless advised otherwise.

Commence these steps after completing Part A - Management of Plagiarism Identification and Reporting.

  STEPS RESPONSIBILITY COMMENTS
1.

The student may request a hearing within 7 working days of being notified.

If a student does not request a hearing within 7 working days, the Faculty will proceed on the basis the student does not wish to appeal the report and will process a result in accordance with the incident number (1 or 2). The Faculty/Centre must notify the student of the penalty incurred.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee

Plagiarism Officer (PO)

Templates for letters informing a student of the outcome of a first or second incident, no hearing:

Plagiarism 1st Incident No Hearing Result - Attachment 5

Plagiarism 2nd Incident No Hearing Result - Attachment 6

2. Following receipt of the request for a hearing, the Exec Dean/Director or nominee arranges a meeting (in person or via phone or video link) as soon as practical between themselves, the PO and the student, giving the student at least 7 working days' notice.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee

PO

A student should always be granted a hearing to provide them with the opportunity to present evidence to refute or mitigate the charge.

This must be used as an opportunity to educate a student on plagiarism and how to avoid plagiarism.

Template for the letter acknowledging a student’s request for a hearing in the first or second incident:

Plagiarism Hearing Notification - Attachment 7

3.

A student should be notified of the result of a hearing in writing as soon as possible.

Hearing Not Upheld

If the student is found 'not guilty' of plagiarism, then the assessor is informed to reverse the forfeiture of credit. The Faculty/Centre should destroy any documents pertaining to the case.

Hearing Upheld

If the report of plagiarism is upheld at the hearing, the notification must include details of the University's appeals process and how the student can access this.

At the conclusion of a hearing under Regulation 6.1.1, section 5(1), a confidential written report by the nominated person will be submitted to the Executive Dean/Director or nominee within 3 working days of the student being notified of the decision.

Also, if the report is upheld, all paperwork about the incident and a Plagiarism Report is to be forwarded to Central Records for retention and entering into the Plagiarism Register.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee

PO

Templates for letters informing a student of the outcome of a first or second incident hearing, not upheld:

Plagiarism 1st Incident Hearing Outcome - Attachment 9

Plagiarism 2nd Incident Hearing Outcome - Attachment 10

Templates for letters informing a student of the outcome of a first incident hearing, upheld:

Plagiarism 1st Incident Hearing Outcome Upheld - Attachment 11

Plagiarism 2nd Incident Hearing Outcome Upheld - Attachment 12

NB. Attachments 11 and 12 contain details of the University’s appeals process.

4.

If a first or second incident is upheld at the Faculty/Centre hearing, a student has the right to appeal the result to the University Appeals Committee.

The student must lodge an appeal with the University Appeals Committee within 7 working days of receiving notification of the outcome of the Faculty/Centre hearing.

In accordance with Regulation 2.2, a student can only appeal to the Appeals Committee if they have new evidence that was not known at the time of the Faculty/Centre hearing or if an irregularity of procedure has taken place.

EO, University Appeals Committee

An appeal must be submitted by a student in writing to the EO, University Appeals Committee.

If a student is unsure whether they are able to appeal, they should contact the EO, University Appeals Committee for advice. Refer to:

http://federation.edu.au/about-feduni/governance/academic-board/standing-committees/appeals-committee

University Appeals Form

5.

The University Appeals Committee has the power to recommend the dismissal of the plagiarism report.

The EO of the University Appeals Committee will advise the student of the outcome of the request for an appeal within 10 working days.

EO, University Appeals Committee  
6.

If an appeal to the University Appeals Committee is unsuccessful, a student has the right to access the external complaints and appeals process of the Victorian Ombudsman:

International students within 10 working days, due to visa requirements and limited period for appeal before expiration of student visa.

Domestic students can have longer, period of time to be advised.

EO, University Appeals Committee

All students who have used the appeals process must be made aware of the external process available to them.
7.

At the conclusion of any hearing and appeal process, if plagiarism is upheld, all paperwork about the current incident and a Plagiarism Report is to be forwarded to Central Records for retention and entering into the Plagiarism Register.

If the report is not upheld the Faculty/Centre should destroy any documents pertaining to the case.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee

PO

Central Records

Faculties/Centres should not retain any copies of a specific student's plagiarism documentation. Everything must be returned to Central Records including copies of all correspondence sent to students regarding an incident, notes taken during hearing/s if applicable, and any additional information.

Plagiarism Report - Attachment 1

Part C - Management of Plagiarism Hearing Process, 3rd Incident

Due to the nature of plagiarism and the time constraints involved, Faculties/Centres need to ensure that students are notified immediately where evidence of plagiarism exists.

The University’s goal is to provide a fair and consistent approach to managing cases of alleged plagiarism and ensuring that the penalties for plagiarism are clear and readily understandable by staff and students.

At any stage of an investigation into alleged plagiarism, the student/s should be advised to remain enrolled in their program for the duration of the process, unless advised otherwise.

Commence these steps after completing Part A - Management of Plagiarism Identification and Reporting.

  STEPS RESPONSIBILITY COMMENTS
1.

A third incident of plagiarism is sent directly to the Student Discipline Committee. No hearing is held within the Faculty/Centre.

The Executive Dean/Director or nominee of the Faculty/Centre forwards relevant material with a request for a hearing to the Executive Officer of the Student Discipline Committee.

Within 10 working days of receipt of the complaint,the EO of the Student Discipline Committee organises a Committee meeting within 21 working days and sends notification to the student and Executive Dean/Director or nominee of the Faculty/Centre.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee of Faculty/Centre

EO, Student Discipline Committee

The EO, Student Discipline Committee will arrange the time, date, and place for the hearing and provide the student with:

  1. Notice of the matters determined under this sub-section;
  2. Particulars of the complaint made against the student; and
  3. A copy of the Regulation 2.4 and Statute 2.4 and Regulation 6.1.1.

Students can attend the hearing either in person, or via phone or video link.

2.

A student should be notified in writing of the result of a Student Discipline Hearing within 7 working days of the hearing. The outcome may affect a student’s visa (if an international student).

This notification must include details of any further steps in the appeals process available to the student.

EO, Student Discipline Committee

Template for the letter informing a student of the outcome of a Student Discipline hearing is held by Legal and prepared by the Chair of the Student Discipline Committee.

A copy of this letter should be forwarded to the Executive Dean/Director or nominee of the Faculty/Centre.

If an international student is involved, the Centre for University Partnerships (CUP) must be notified of the result of a Student Discipline Hearing if the incident is upheld and the student’s enrolment is terminated.

3. If an appeal to the Student Discipline Committee is unsuccessful, a student has the right to access the external complaints and appeals process of the Victorian Ombudsman within 10 working days. EO, Student Discipline Committee All students who have used the appeals process must be made aware of the external process available to them.
4.

At the conclusion of any hearing and appeal process, if plagiarism is upheld, all paperwork regarding the current incident and a Plagiarism Report is to be forwarded to Central Records for retention and entering into the Plagiarism Register. If the report is dismissed, the Faculty/Centre should destroy any documents pertaining to the case.

The EO of the Student Discipline Committee has a separate Plagiarism Register and details of the plagiarism will be recorded on this Register.

Executive Dean/Director or nominee of Faculty/Centre

PO

Central Records

EO, Student Discipline Committee

Faculties/Centres should not retain any copies of a specific student’s plagiarism documentation. Everything must be returned to Central Records, including copies of all correspondence sent to the student about an incident, notes taken during hearing/s, and any additional information.

Plagiarism Report - Attachment 1

Responsibilities

Associated Documents

Policies and Procedures

* The educative, preventative and detection strategies, outlined in this procedure, are taken from 'Assessing Learning in Australian Universities', Centre for the Study of Higher Education, The University of Melbourne.

Proformas and Templates

Forms

Forms

Plagiarism Appeal Form to the Executive Dean/Director or nominee (currently under development)

Appeal to the University Appeals Committee Form

Record Keeping

Title Location Responsible Officer Minimum Retention Period
Plagiarism Report Form and associated paperwork Central Records Chair, Academic Board 15 years

Implementation

The Student Plagiarism Procedure will be implemented throughout the University via:

  1. An Announcement Notice posted on the University News Webpage;
  2. Inclusion on the University Policy Library;
  3. Information Sessions; and/or
  4. Training Sessions; and/or
  5. Documentation distribution, eg. posters, brochures.